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  • Mittelrhein-Verlag and Canoo start collaboration

    October 31st, 2012

    The Koblenz-based publishing house Mittelrhein-Verlag (publisher of the large regional newspaper Rhein-Zeitung and manufacturer of the mobile editorial system red.web) and Canoo have agreed to collaborate closely. The contracts were signed yesterday at the ongoing World Publishing Expo in Frankfurt.

    The publisher is going to integrate Canoo Find-it in red.web and offer it to its customers as an optinal plugin. Find-it automatically assigns relevant keywords to all texts in the editorial system and thereby creates an intuitive and consistent structure across the entire range of texts: articles, agency reports, emails, office documents, images, etc.

    There are multiple benefits for red.web customers: significant workflow support for their journalists and editorial management, and new attractive options for their news site.

    Detailed information can be found in the red.web plugin description.

    red.web

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    Canoo at W-JAX 2012

    October 29th, 2012

    W-JAX 2012 will be opening its doors next week to this annual event. Canoo has in store the two key topics, JavaFX and user experience, for its conference visitors. JavaFX, as the official successor to Swing, is the focus of the JavaFX power workshops. Meanwhile, user experience is creating a sensation at the eponymous Special Day. And on no account should you miss our new open source project Dolphin, which will also be presented at W-JAX on Tuesday evening following its première at JavaOne Keynote in October.

    In a total of five sessions, a power workshop and a keynote you can experience Dierk König and Gerrit Grunwald live. Furthermore, the Canoo expo stand will be providing an additional focal point at which our software experts will be glad to answer your questions on the programme topics W-JAX and technology trends. We are looking forward to your visit! Click here for an overview of all W-JAX talks.

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    JavaOne Final Remarks

    October 8th, 2012

    JavaOne 2012 was sursprisingly good. The keynotes were mostly down to earth, less show than in earlier years. Compared to the first 10 years of JavaOne there were again considerably less attendants (remember the > 20000 attendants in 2001?). However, Java is definitely back on track after a bumpy ride during the last years of Sun Microsystems and after the takeover by Oracle. I do not expect many innovations in the Java world, it’s a mature ecosystem and rather needs a careful evolution.

    JavaFX was very prominent in the desktop tracks. Version 2 is definitely the right approach for replacing Swing and provides a highly capable desktop UI toolkit. There were a number of impressive demos showing off what can be achieved with JavaFX. In the mobile realm Java has lost the race, though. I cannot imagine how Java ME can ever compete against iOS and Android. Hence, Oracle is focusing on the embedded domain with Java ME, which is a smart move. The enterprise backend is definitely Java’s stronghold. It is so well entrenched that investment protection is the most important constraint with any changes or additions to Java EE.

    Maybe I was just lucky, but most of the presentations I attended were above average. It rarely got boring, and an occasional lack of presentation skills was usually compensated by strong technical content. Only the conference venue was not up to my expectations (same complaint as two years ago). Most presentations took place in the Hilton hotel which is a maze and the rooms are not well suited for a conference (there is a reason why most of the rooms are named * ballroom). The Moscone convention center would be far better (as in earlier years of the JavaOne) but Oracle requires it now for the way more crowded Oracle OpenWorld.

    Last but not least my favourite JavaOne T-Shirt:

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    JavaOne Day 4

    October 7th, 2012

    Java Community Keynote

    The Java Community Keynote started my fourth and last day at JavaOne. Java is driven both by Oracle and the community. The balance between these two seems quite good and is successfully evolving Java.

    In previous JavaOne conferences the keynote on the last day was always by and for geeks and nerds with James Gosling usually taking the stage as the über-geek. At least the second part of todays keynote lived up to my expectations. The first part of the keynote was nothing to write home about, so I just comment on the geek stuff. Surprisingly enough, James Gosling took stage again. He left Oracle after the takeover of Sun Microsystems under not so friendly terms – at least this was my impression. All the more surprising that had made an appearance. James is now working for a company called Liquid Robots and his presentation was nothing short of stunning. Liquid Robots builds and operates marine robots called “wave glider” that autonomously cruise the seas, propelled by wave power and powering their sensors and controllers from solar panels. They gather data of all sorts to monitor the environment or can, for example, be deployed to watch out for sea mammals while seismic explorations are taking place. James mentioned that they recently surveyed the water temperatures in the Arctic and the results are more than alarming with respect to the earth climate. The challenges in operating the wave gliders are quite different for ordinary IT, e.g. reliability is one of them (loosing a marine robot is pretty expensive) or sending data over the Iridium network costs 1$ per Kilobyte. Sending one terabyte of data costs about the same as starting your own satellite network. He then demoed the monitoring tool which is based on Swing. James is still a Swing fan, claiming that HTML5 is by far not up to the task of building the kind of applications they are using.  The demo showed both live  and historic data, visualizing the path of 5 wave gliders launched in Hawaii and one is already close to Australia! He could zoom in, display nearby ships and other data – impressive mashup. This was one of the best JavaOne demos I have ever seen and for once I was glad that the presenter took way more time than was allocated.

    Building HTML5 Web Apps with Avatar

    Avatar is a new Web application framework being developed by Oracle. There is almost no information available, it is still in its infancy and there aren’t any prodcut plans yet. It is targeted at Web developers with a strong background in HTML and JavaScript rather than the typical Java developer. Avatar favours a fat client architecture and focuses on JavaScript-only development, i.e. both the client-side (views, presentation logic and business logic) and the server-side (e.g. REST services) are developed in JavaScript. The server-side code is executed in the Nashorn JavaScript engine on top of the JVM. Hence, the entire JDK is available to JavaScript developers too. The client side is a mix of declarative code (UI in XML) and imperative code (presentation logic in JavaScript). There are already editor plugins available for Eclipse and Idea.

    To me this looked like yet another Web Application Framework. It does not answer the question how to protect your investment in business and presentation logic. On the contrary, it is tempting to put a lot of business logic along with the presentation logic on the client side which binds you tightly into Avatar. In five years at latest the next technology will come along forcing you to migrate major parts of your application. Dolphin, Canoo’s open source infrastructure for distributed presentation models, would help to enforce a clean separation between client and server and thereby protecting your investment in the business and presentation logic.

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    JavaOne 2012 | Sept 30-Oct 4, 2012 | San Francisco

    October 4th, 2012
    Meet Andres Almiray, Dierk König and Gerrit Grunwald at JavaOne in San Francisco. Our experts will present various talks, sessions and keynotes. The details are shown in the content catalog. Be part of this event!
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